Northeast Neighborhood Plan

The final version of the Northeast Neighborhood Plan was unanimously approved by the Wake Forest Board of Commissioners during the board's regular monthly meeting on July 17, 2007.

Wake Forest initiated a process to develop a Neighborhood Plan for the northeast section of town. The northeast quadrant is bordered by Wait Avenue to the north, North White Street to the west, and abuts the downtown commercial area.


Purpose
The purpose of the Neighborhood Plan is to develop a strategy for enhancing the social, cultural and historical character of the area by identifying needed public services, desired physical improvements within the neighborhood, and economic development opportunities that would bring local services and jobs to the area. The plan will suggest mechanisms for implementing these community enhancements.


East End Community
The northeast quadrant is home to approximately 2,000 people and is comprised mostly of single-family housing with some private and public multi-family developments, churches, small businesses, and a local park and cemetery. The neighborhood also includes the DuBois Center - a Rosenwald School campus with five buildings listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The DuBois campus is the current temporary location of a Wake County elementary school.


Planning Process
Wake Forest officially kicked off the planning process with a community meeting on December 4 at Olive Branch Baptist Church. Altogether, over 100 people attended the meeting, including residents, property owners, and other interested citizens. The Town presented the planning process and gave the attendees a chance to offer their comments on the needs, wishes, and opportunities for the planning area.

The Town has enlisted the help of Clarion Associates, a planning consulting firm, for assistance on this project. During the first meeting, Clarion's Roger Waldon separated the attendees into three groups to facilitate an open discussion of items on the agenda. The group discussion was guided by the following list of questions:

1. What would you like the neighborhood to be in 20 years?
2. What is it that you especially like about this neighborhood today?
3. What don't you like about this neighborhood today?
4. What concerns do you have about this neighborhood for the future?
5. What public facilities are needed by the neighborhood (street lights, sidewalks, bus stops, road improvements, etc.)?
6. What types of commercial/job opportunities would you like to see in the neighborhood?
7. Anything else you'd like the Planning Board and Town Board of Commissioners to know?
8. What else can we do to reach all who might have an interest in participating in this process?

Following the group discussion, the three groups re-convened to share their ideas. Clarion and Associates compiled the comments expressed during the meeting and assembled a report that was provided to the Town.

For more information, contact Chip Russell at 919-435-9511.